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My Vitiligo Story | From Roshaan Narkedayy’s Diary

“Vitiligo is not something to be feared or stigmatized, but a condition that should be accepted and celebrated like any other difference that makes us unique,” says Roshaan Narkedayy, a creator and investor from India.

Roshaan Narkedayy

My name is Roshaan Narkedayy, and I am a former IT professional, creator, and investor from Pune, India, aged 35. My experience with Vitiligo began when I noticed a small white patch on my neck after cutting my long hair in the Dhoni Style.

Initially, I didn’t know what to make of it, but as the patches began to spread, I learned that I had a condition that causes a loss of skin pigmentation. I was heartbroken when I first learned about Vitiligo from my doctor brother while staying in my hostel during summer vacation. I was concerned about how it would affect my appearance as I aged, and I cried myself to sleep that night. But I quickly realized that my father also had the same condition for most of his body, and it was not as noticeable until he was older.

As a young person with Vitiligo, I experienced discrimination and misunderstandings, and I felt ashamed of my appearance. However, I learned to embrace my differences and love myself for who I am. I became proud of my “spots,” and I realized that my differences were something to be celebrated. Over time, I began to connect with others in the Vitiligo community and spread positivity and awareness. Although I appreciated the concern and support from others, I also faced questions and unwanted attention in public places, which made it important for me to challenge misconceptions and educate others about Vitiligo treatments.

Despite the progress I made in accepting and loving myself, I still had to endure hurtful discrimination and offensive comments about my relationships and job prospects. However, I did not let these experiences hold me back, and I continued to advocate for myself and pursue my dreams. I hope to inspire others with Vitiligo to embrace their differences, seek support, express themselves creatively, and never let their condition hold them back from pursuing their dreams.

Vitiligo is not something to be feared or stigmatized, but a condition that should be accepted and celebrated like any other difference that makes us unique.

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